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Bowdoin Col 

Bulletin 




Number 135 



May, 1924 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



1938-1924 




I 



Brunswick, Maine 

Entered u ftecond-clau matter, June 28, 1907, At Branawick, Maine, 
under Act of ConjriwM of July 16, 1894 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE COLLEGE 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 

of BOWDOIN COLLEGE 

FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR, 1923-1924 



TOGETHER WITH THE REPORTS OF THE DEAN, THE 
LIBRARIAN, AND THE DIRECTOR OF THE MUSEUM OF 
FINE ARTS ::::::::::: 



1923 




1924 



BRUNSWICK, 

PRINTED FOR THE COLLEGE, 



MAINE 

MCMXXIV 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 



To the Trustees and Overseers of Bowdoin College : 

I beg to submit the following report for the academic year 
1923-24 in accordance with the By-Laws of the College, which 
provide that "the President shall annually make a report to the 
Boards, to be presented in print at their annual meetings, of the 
condition and moral character and work of the College during 
the year then last past, with such details as to the activities of 
the College as will inform the Boards from year to year of the 
standing of the College and the administration of its trusts." 

Edward Stanwood, a Trustee of the College since 1904, died 
at his home in Brookline, Massachusetts, October 11, 1923, aged 
eighty-two years. He graduated in the class of 1861 : from 
1886 to 1904 he served as an Overseer, and for many years of 
his trusteeship he was a member of the important Finance Com- 
mittee, since the death of Judge Putnam being the chairman. 
Few men in New England have had more distinguished careers 
as a journalist. He was editor of the Boston Advertiser from 
1867 to 1882, and from 1887 to 191 1 was managing editor of 
the Youth's Companion, continuing as contributing editor until 
his death. He also wrote several important books on modern 
American political history. In character he was marked by the 
best traits of the older New England, being independent in 
judgment and of old-fashioned intellectual and moral integrity. 
A man not without inclination to prejudice, he was neverthe- 
less fairminded in his conclusions. One of the greatest pleas- 
ures he had in his long, distinguished life was the opportunity 
to serve his Alma Mater. Everything that concerned Bowdoin 
touched his heart and was to him of interest and importance. 
The College has had few more devoted sons. 

John Eliphaz Chapman, an Overseer of the College since 
1915, died at his home in Brunswick on December 24, 1923, 
aged seventy years. He was graduated in the class of 1877 and 



4 Bowdoin College 

for many years was its ideal secretary. A brother of the late 
Professor Chapman, he knew intimately the problems of the 
College and was a prudent and unselfish counsellor. In every 
circle in which he moved he was greatly beloved, and his 
sweet Christian character made him the most delightful of 
friends. 

Henry Crosby Emery, an Overseer of the College since 1910, 
died at sea, on his way home from China, February 6, 1924, 
aged fifty-one years. Graduating in the class of 1892 he returned 
to the College, serving as instructor from 1894 to 1897, and as 
professor from 1897 to 1900 in what was then the new depart- 
ment of economics. In 1900 he went to Yale as professor of 
economics and remained on the Faculty there until 1909 when 
for four years under President Taft he served as chairman of 
the United States Tariff Board. Of late years he had been 
connected with important banking interests in New York City, 
Russia, and China. He was a man of unusual gifts and of very 
rare personal charm and was frequently regarded as the most 
brilliant Bowdoin graduate of his generation. His friends, 
whom he numbered by the hundred, feel in his death as if a real 
light had gone out. 

Henry Brewer Quinby, an Overseer of the College since 
I9ii,»died, in New York City, February 8, 1924, aged seventy- 
seven years. He graduated in the class of 1869, sixty-three 
years after his grandfather, Moses Quinby, had obtained his 
degree in the first class at Bowdoin. Mr. Quinby was an im- 
portant figure in the political life of New Hampshire, serving 
in both branches of the legislature and on the council, and 
from 1909 to 191 1 he was Governor of the State. A loyal son 
of the College he rarely missed a Commencement, and one of 
the last gatherings he attended was the alumni dinner in New 
York. His courtesy, his loyalty to friends and college, made 
him ever welcome, and his genial presence will long be missed 
whenever the sons of the College who knew him meet together. 

In addition to the mention of these officers of the College, it 
is fitting to record the death at his home in Portland on Decem- 
ber 14, 1923, of Dr. Addison S. Thayer, Dean of the Medical 



Report of President 5 

School from 191 1 to 1921, a wise administrator and regarded 
as one of the most skilful physicians in the State of Maine. 

During the summer the College was called on to mourn the 
loss of Mrs. Kate Douglas Wiggin Riggs, the president of the 
Society of Bowdoin Women, who died in Harrow, England, on 
August 24, 1923. Since the conferring of the degree of Doctor 
of Letters upon her in 1904 she had been a devoted daughter 
of the College. 

I should like also to mention here the death in Brunswick on 
January 20, 1924, of Charles H. Winslow, carpenter, one of 
the most faithful employees that the College ever had. 

GIFTS RECEIVED FROM APRIL 1, 1923 TO MARCH 31, 1924 

Sumner I. Kimball Prize, Sumner I. Kimball $ 2,500 00 

Horace Lord Piper Prize, Sumner I. Kimball 1,000 00 

Beverly Scholarship, Beverly Men's Singing Club . . 1,700 00 

E. B. Smith Estate, Additions 2,271 00 

Forbes Rickard Prize, Mrs. Forbes Rickard 10 00 

Francis LeBaron Mayhew Scholarship, Estate of 

Calista Mayhew 5,86o 55 

Mayhew Lectureship, Estate of Calista Mayhew . . . 4,883 79 

Alumni Fund, General Education Board 19,170 66 

Alumni Fund, Alumni Contributions 3 ^877 84 

Alumni Income Fund, Alumni Contributions to 

Income 7,420 00 

Library, C. A. Coffin 50 00 

Library, James E. Rhodes, 2nd 15 00 

Library, Philip H. Kimball 10 00 

Hawthorne Prize, Mrs. Kate Douglas Wiggin Riggs 40 00 

Wm. G. Beale Bequest, Estate of Wm. G. Beale . . . 5,000 00 
Fund for publication of Psychology Books, Dwight 

W. Morrow, Esq 1,000 00 

Estate of W. M. Payson, Chimes, Estate of W. M. 

Payson 1,500 00 

Chimes, F. C. Payson 340 00 

Blake Bequest, Estate of E. H. Blake 500,000 00 

Deane Scholarship, Estate of Sarah M. B. Deane . . 842 04 



6 Bowdoin College 

Gift of E. S. Powers for General Purposes, Estate 

of E. S. Powers 90 00 

Charles H. Gilman Scholarship, Mrs. Mary L. 

Gilman 1,000 00 

Juilliard Musical Foundation for Scholarships .... 800 00 

Westbrook Scholarship, Luther Dana 100 00 

President's Loan Fund, Philip G. Clifford, Sec'y. . . . 165 97 



• 



Total $587,646 85 

The total amount of gifts for this year is the largest in the 
history of the College. This is due, of course, to the receipt 
of the magnificent legacy from the late Edward H. Blake, of 
Bangor. According to the vote of the Boards at their meeting 
in February, this legacy is made a special memorial fund, the 
income to be used, until further notice, for instruction. 

At the last Commencement the beautiful gate-way in memory 
of Professor and Mrs. Franklin C. Robinson was dedicated, as 
was a most attractive bulletin board presented by the Class of 
1898. 

For purposes of record a list of gifts to the College for the 
last ten years is here appended. 

GIFTS TO THE COLLEGE FROM 1913-14 TO DATE 

Year ending: 

March 31, 1914 $ 94,559 79 

March 31, 191. s 23,425 00 

March 31, 1916 147,932 69 

March 31, 1917 63,376 10 

March 30, 1918 i37.5 I 5 9 2 

March 30, 1919 21,672 1 1 

March 31, 1920 21,974 90 

March 31, 1921 118,891 03 

March 31, 1922 181,491 15 

March 31, 1923 240,745 27 

March 31, 1924 587,646 85 

Total $1,639,230 81 



Report of President 7 

CHANGES IN THE FACULTY 

During the first semester Professor Van Cleve was absent 
on leave, and during the second semester Professor Cram and 
Associate Professor Wass were on their sabbatical. All of 
these professors spent their leave in study in Europe. At the 
last commencement Henry B. Dewing, Ph.D., was elected Pro- 
fessor of Greek to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Pro- 
fessor Woodruff. Dr. Dewing has had a varied and successful 
experience, both as a teacher and a scholar, having served on 
the staff of Robert College, Constantinople, where he was some 
time Dean, and of Princeton and the University of Texas. His 
scholarship and his teaching ability have made him a most val- 
uable addition to our Faculty. Another appointment last Com- 
mencement was that of Wilfrid H. Crook, A.M., to be Assistant 
Professor of Economics and Sociology to fill the vacancy 
caused by the resignation of Assistant Professor Glenn R. 
Johnson. Mr. Crook is a graduate of Oxford and took graduate 
work and did some teaching at Harvard University. In the 
second semester we added to our teaching staff in the Depart- 
ment of German, William B. Jacob, A.B., a graduate of the 
College in 1923. 

THE FACULTY 

Since the college is primarily an institution of learning, its 
reputation and its service alike depend in a large measure upon 
its teaching staff. Beautiful buildings with attractive grounds, 
splendid college morale and spirit, and a high-minded under- 
graduate body are all vain and idle concommittants to a 
college unless there is inspiring teaching. A good many things 
are being said nowadays to the discredit of the modem under- 
graduate. Some of this criticism is just but most of it is beside 
the point. Yet there is general agreement in academic circles 
that the undergraduate of today responds more quickly and 
more effectively to good teaching than ever before. If the in- 
tellectual tone of a college is low, it is the fault of those in 
charge of the college and not of the undergraduates. The main 



8 Bozvdoin College 

emphasis of college administration should always be put on 
the teaching staff. We Americans have, I think, been guilty 
of putting too much emphasis on the log and too little on the 
Mark Hopkins. It is all very well and all very necessary to 
provide suitable buildings and surroundings and comforts and 
luxuries for the students. It is highly desirable to put the 
business of the college on a sound basis. It is well to have all 
the machinery connected with the college run smoothly ; but 
when we have done all that we have hardly begun our real task 
which is to provide the best teaching it is possible to procure. 
Poor buildings and excellent teachers are much to be preferred 
to beautiful halls and wooden instruction. 

To be frank, we have not at Bowdoin a sufficiently large 
Faculty at present, nor are we paying sufficiently high salaries, 
and I think that the amount available for instruction is not in 
proper proportion to the other expenses of the College. That 
is, we are expending as much or mbre for maintenance as we 
are for teaching. We ought to add as soon as possible five or 
six additional instructors to our staff, especially if we intend to 
develop the system of general examinations and to give to our 
students in the Junior and Senior years more direction and 
supervision in their fields of concentration. Furthermore, al- 
though the salaries at Bowdoin have been raised more than 
45% in the past few years, they must soon be raised again if 
we are to keep up with the pace set by other New England in- 
stitutions. The salary of a professor at Bowdoin, which is now 
$4,000, ought to be $5,000 as soon as we can possibly manage 
the increase. When our salary scale is on that basis we may 
very well consider the advisability of establishing a few special 
professorships at higher stipends as rewards for unusual ex- 
cellence in scholarship and research. We are endeavoring to en- 
courage scholarship among the Faculty by being generous with 
sabbaticals, by having the hours of teaching reasonable, and in 
other ways. As I said in my report last year, a good deal of 
productive, scholarly work is at present being done by the 
Faculty of Bowdoin College. There is such a vital connection 
between scholarship and teaching that one can hardly over 



Report of President 9 

emphasize the importance of encouraging research, particularly 
in a college like ours that is remote from university centers and 
where we are all too liable to become complacent. 



LIMITATION OF NUMBERS 

At the annual meeting of the Boards held in June, 1923, it 
was voted to limit the membership of the College to about five 
hundred students, and a joint committee consisting of members 
of the Governing Boards and members of the Faculty was 
appointed to study the whole question of limitation. This com- 
mittee, of which Dean Nixon was secretary and Mr. William J. 
Curtis, of New York, was chairman, made a careful study of 
the whole matter, submitted a large number of questions to the 
alumni and to representatives of other institutions, and prepared 
a report which was presented at a special meeting of the Boards 
held in February. At this special meeting it was voted to limit 
the freshman class to about one hundred and fifty men, and 
furthermore it was voted that, beginning with the fall of 1926, 
the College, in selecting a freshman class, would show a decided 
preference to candidates who offered for admission subjects 
required for the A.B. course. "Preference will be shown to 
those candidates for the B.S. course who offer for admission 
the college's regular and approved subjects only, with no so- 
called free margin points, and who present the largest propor- 
tion of those subjects which demand two or more years of study 
and receive two or more units of credit/' This policy is based 
on what seems to us the thoroughly sound idea that fewer sub- 
jects more thoroughly studied bring better results than a scat- 
tered knowledge of a great many subjects. It is firmly opposed 
to the theory now so prevalent among so many school men that 
any subject is a good preparation for college. 

It will probably be increasingly difficult for a student with 
conditions to enter Bowdoin. Last fall no one was admitted 
with more than one unit condition and the excellent showing of 
the freshman class during the first semester was a sign that 
good preparation is essential to good work in college. We do 



io Bowdoin College 

not intend to make our standards of admission unreasonably 
severe. We do not intend to get out of touch with high schools 
in Maine and neighboring states ; but we do believe in admin- 
istering the standards of admission honestly and with some 
rigidity. A well-prepared student has so much better a chance 
for a happy and successful college career that the insistence of 
the College upon the necessity of meeting entrance require- 
ments fully is in the interests of the candidate as well as to the 
advantage of the institution. 

The Governing Boards have as yet taken no action on the 
perplexing problem of preference due to locality or to Bowdoin 
relationship. Probably no such action is necessary. The loca- 
tion of the College and her long and intimate relations with the 
State of Maine make it probable that a large number of boys 
will still come from Maine, and Bowdoin alumni will see to it 
that their sons are properly prepared for admission and entered 
in due season on the list of applicants. Always with a clear 
understanding of other things being equal, in a small college 
like ours, sons of alumni would naturally have preference, and 
no true Bowdoin man would want any further favors. 

There is nothing magical about the number five hundred, nor 
about the limiting of the freshman class to about one hundred 
and fifty; but at present not only the facilities but the organiza- 
tion of the College require that we keep Bowdoin at about that 
size. One thing is prefectly clear, that no college has a right 
to accept more candidates than it can properly and adequately 
train,' and we must not dilute the kind of education we give by 
accepting more candidates for admission than we can house 
comfortably and teach thoroughly. 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

In addition to the President and other members of the Fac- 
ulty as speakers at the Sunday afternoon Chapel services, we 
have had the Rev. Thompson E. Ashby and the Rev. Harry F. 
Shook, of Brunswick; President James L. McConaughy, of 
Knox College: the Rev. Chester B. Emerson, D.D., of Detroit; 
the Rev. Malcolm Taylor, of Boston ; Judge Charles F. John- 



Report of President i i 

son, of Portland; Major George Haven Putnam, of New York; 
the Rev. Joel H. Metcalf, of Portland; and Mr. Frank G. Far- 
rington, of Augusta. During Holy Week at the morning Chapel 
services a series of addresses was given by different members 
of the Faculty. We have found that laymen with a religious 
message make a deep impression upon the college students. 

Religious Preference 1923-24 

Congregational 160 

Episcopal 48 

Baptist 46 

Methodist 40 

Universalist 36 

Roman Catholic 30 

Unitarian 22 

Presbyterian 11 

Jewish 9 

Christian Science 8 

Lutheran 4 

Christian 3 

Spiritualist 

Swedish 

Friends 

Reformed 

Disciples of Christ 

Greek Orthodox 

No preference 69 



49-> 
GENERAL EXAMINATIONS 

The system of general examinations required of Seniors in 
their major subjects has now been in operation long enough 
for one to come to some conclusion, even if the whole matter 
is in the experimental stage. Personally, I feel that many of 
the reasons for putting in these general examinations have been 
more than justified. The interest in them on the part of Seniors 



12 Bowdoin College 

is, I think, constantly increasing and they are being taken with 
more and more seriousness. Several Seniors this year have 
remained in residence during the holidays to read for their 
examinations. The emphasis on subject rather than on courses 
is also valuable. To impress upon a youth about to be graduated 
from the College that he ought to have sufficient information 
about some particular subject to enable him to talk intelli- 
gently on that subject, has been worth while. I feel also that 
the oral examinations in connection with the written ones are 
of very real benefit. I have visited several of the examinations 
this year and have been impressed with the progress made bv 
the candidates. In order to have the system work ideally 
we should have undoubtedly more supervision, which cannot be 
given until the Faculty is increased. In certain departments extra 
work, sometimes involving a thesis, is required instead of the 
general examination; but more and more of the boys themselves 
prefer to take the examinations. I believe that it is no exag- 
geration to say that it has in a measure transformed the work 
of the Senior year in that the students now feel that there is 
something to be done in addition to their formal courses. By 
vote of the Faculty, students who pass their general examina- 
tions with honor grades are excused from the examinations 
in the courses in their major field that semester. It is interest- 
ing to note that whereas Bowdoin was, I believe, the first to 
follow the lead of Harvard, general examinations are now be- 
ing required in many of our colleges. The alumni and friends 
of Bowdoin should remember that throughout the country more 
and more work is being required of candidates for the bachelor's 
degree. If we are to be as proud of the Bowdoin degree in the 
future as we. have had reason to be in the past, we must see 
that in no respect are the standards lowered. 

THE WAR MEMORIAL 

During the past year there has been a good deal of discus- 
sion carried on in the Orient and at alumni meetings concern- 
ing the War Memorial. The plan for a rostrum as presented 
by the committee has been put in the hands of the alumni and 



Report of President [3 

a letter from the secretary of the committee has explained 
exactly what has been done. The site of the rostrum has not 
yet been definitely decided, nor have any steps been taken by 
the committee up to this time to raise funds. It is felt that 
the project cannot be carried to a successful conclusion unless 
it has the hearty support of the alumni in general, and the 
committee during the past year has been endeavoring to see 
whether or not such support would be given. 

The committee has gone on the assumption that the alumni 
would prefer to have as a memorial something of an artistic 
nature, leaving to other times the completion of projects that 
are primarily ultilitarian. There is a feeling on the part of a 
good many that the actual monument or memorial should be 
primarily of an artistic quality, even if it is desirable to make 
other projects also memorials. 

We need of course as much as ever a Union ; but in the pres- 
ent condition of the college funds we should not be able to 
accept a Union unless means were provided for its maintenance. 
However, if a Union were erected one of the rooms might very 
well be used for memorial purposes, to include the names of 
those who served, with particular reference to those who died. 
Another suggestion has been made that Memorial Hall be com- 
pletely renovated. 

There is, I think, one thing on which all the alumni will 
agree, that when the memorial is definitely and finally decided 
upon it must have our enthusiastic and united support. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Library is in many ways the heart of the College. Its 
importance is so great as to justify the officers of the College in 
calling attention to its needs. The admirable letters of the 
librarian in the Orient have won much favorable comment and 
have already resulted in gifts. The Faculty this year has re- 
quested of the Boards an additional appropriation of $1,000 for 
the purchase of books and this appropriation has been recom- 
mended by the Visiting Committee. We need to have more 



14 Bowdoin College 

book funds. The work in some of our departments is handi- 
capped because we are not able to supply all the books, maga- 
zines, and periodicals that are actually needed. 

We have one of the most beautiful and well-equipped library 
buildings in the country. Hubbard Hall should inspire us all 
to see that the library itself, which is inside, is in every respect 
as satisfactory as the building. 

NEEDS OF THE COLLEGE 

i. Additions to our endowment so that faculty salaries may 
be increased and more members added to the Faculty. 

2. A Union adequately endowed. 

3. Additional book funds for the library. 

4. A swimming pool. 

5. A new organ for the Chapel. 

6. A more dignified entrance to our beautiful Athletic Field. 

7. A fund for concerts. 

8. A fund for college preachers. 

9. A publication fund. 

CHANGES IN FACULTY REGULATIONS 

The College Laws provide that the President shall annually 
report to the Boards for their approval all regulations adopted 
by the Faculty since their last annual meeting. In accordance 
with this provision I add a list of such regulations. 

1. That the Faculty approve the formation of a Dean's List 
of exceptionally high-standing students who will be given un- 
usual privileges with respect to attendance at recitations and 
other college exercises. 

• 2. That any student to be eligible for manager or assistant 
manager of any college organization must have class standing. 

3. That a Senior needing less than four courses for grad- 
uation be allowed to take only the number needed with the con- 
sent of the Dean and the department in which he is majoring. 



Report of President 



15 



4. That the Treasurer be instructed in assigning rooms for 
next year to give priority to those students who now occupy 
rooms and wish to retain them for another year, then to in- 
coming members of the freshman class to the number of one 
hundred and fifty, then to upperclassmen. 

5. That henceforth the degree with honors in the major 
subject shall be awarded in three grades: With honors, with 
high honors, with highest honors. 

COURSE FOR TEACHERS 

It has been the policy of Bowdoin for a number of years to 
make some educational experiments every now and then, and 
this year we have done something novel in a course designed 
to help those Seniors who are going into teaching. At the sug- 
gestion of an alumnus who is interested in teaching we have 
designed and carried out a course in the second semester, open 
only to those students who intend to teach. The instruction has 
been given by school officials and teachers chiefly from the 
State of Maine, but with representatives from other states, who 
have given lectures and conferences. The idea of the course 
is to acquaint, in a definite and practical manner, the candidates 
for teaching -with the difficulties that will confront them in 
their first few years. We also have felt in instituting the course 
that it is in a measure an answer to the charge of indifference 
that is often brought against our colleges by people interested 
in the public schools. It is certainly one of the functions of the 
college to train teachers for our schools, and we cannot be too 
careful either about the character or the training of men whom 
we recommend for that most important work. It is a pleasure 
to record that the boys who have taken this course have spoken 
of it with real enthusiasm, and we are grateful for the service 
.rendered by many of our friends who have no connection with 
the College except that of friendly interest. 



DEVELOPMENT OF INDIVIDUAL INITIATIVE 

There are two glaring defects in our present system of educa- 
tion in America. The first is lack of thoroughness in the foun- 



1 6 Bowdoin College 

dations ; the second is a failure to develop individual initiative 
as the student goes from school through college. At Bowdoin 
we have attempted to remedy the first defect by making the 
work in the freshman year a review of high school work with 
the addition of training that will make a good foundation for 
the rest of the college course, and in a measure we have been 
successful ; for a student who gets through his freshman year 
well is usually able to complete his work for the degree. It is 
necessary in the first two years of college to have much of the 
work required, if for no other reason than because the prepara- 
tion in the schools is so varied and so often lacking in thor- 
oughness. 

There is a pretty general feeling not only at Bowdoin but at 
other colleges, that we are not doing enough for the student 
who wants to work on his own. During the last two years of 
the college course self education under direction should be the 
motto. Not a great many of our students are, as yet, fit for 
such liberty as that implies ; but we can, I think, allow boys of 
unusual intellectual ability and ambition more freedom, particu- 
larly in senior year, to work for themselves. At present we can 
take but a few steps in advance as such work as I have indi- 
cated takes a great deal of time on the part of th^ teacher, and 
our Faculty is not large enough to do such supervision as would 
be necessary. We ought, however, to look forward to the time 
when in his senior year the good student, knowing pretty well 
what he wants, may have the opportunity to work in the labora- 
tory or library very much more on his own lines than he is doing 
now, attending such lectures and courses as will help him in 
meeting the requirements of his general examination, but having 
more scholarly freedom than is at present possible. 

THE INSTITUTE OF LITERATURE 

In the spring of 1925 we propose to hold in connection with 
the centenary of the class which included Longfellow and Haw- 
thorne, an Institute of Literature conducted on the lines of the 
successful experiment in History in 1923. The Boards will be 



Report of President 17 

asked to make an appropriation tc cover the expenses of this 
celebration and we hope to have for two weeks some distin- 
guished poets, authors, and scholars who will give lectures and 
readings for the public, and conferences for the undergraduates 
only. 

The purpose of the college is twofold, critical and creative. 
Neither at Bowdoin nor at any other American college have we 
paid enough attention to creative work. There are in many of 
our universities and colleges boys and girls eager to create, 
whether in the field of literature, or art, or music, but some- 
times the college and university atmosphere is too repressive. 
It is our hope that the Institute of Literature will not only re- 
establish in the minds of undergraduates the importance of lit- 
erary study, but will serve also as an incentive to more creative 
work. 

At the meeting of the Boards held in February a special com- 
mittee on the Longfellow and Hawthorne centenary was ap- 
pointed consisting of the President, chairman, and President 
Cole, of Wheaton College from the Board of Trustees, and 
Mr.' Edward Page Mitchell, former editor of the New York 
Sun, Mr. Augustus F. Moulton, of Portland, and Mr. Arthur G. 
Staples, editor of the Lewiston Journal, from the Board of 
Overseers. This committee will work in co-operation with the 
literary departments of the college Faculty. 

SOCIETY OF BOWDOIN WOMEN 

The Society of Bowdoin Women started a few years ago with 
the object then of helping in the endowment fund campaign, is 
being placed on a permanent basis; and since this society has so 
large potentiality of good for the College, the attention of the 
alumni is called to its existence; and I desire to urge them to 
support it. At present the main activities of this society are 
three-fold; in the first place, to enlist all those women who as 
mothers, wives, daughters, sisters, other relatives, or sweet- 
hearts of Bowdoin men, have particular interest in the College ; 
secondly, to provide at Commencement time headquarters not 



1 8 Bowdoin College 

only for the wives of the alumni who may attend the reunions, 
but for the mothers and relatives of the members of the grad- 
uating class; and thirdly, to provide each year some tangible 
token of their interest in the College. This year they have 
given a prize of $200 to be awarded to that student who has 
done the most for the literary interests of the College. Next 
year they propose to raise a fund to secure a lecture by a prom- 
inent literary woman in connection wtih the Longfellow-Haw- 
thorne Centennial. 

Although probably until we have another campaign for funds 
there may not be the incentive for keeping up the local organi- 
zations, there are nevertheless many things that such associa- 
tions can do, as for example, to extend hospitality to the col- 
lege organizations when visiting in their towns, or to promote 
the general feeling of social unity and interest among the 
women friends of the College. If one has the imagination to 
look ahead a bit, one can easily understand how much good will 
come to the College from this sane and splendid organization of 
its women friends. So far as we know the society as organized 
is unique among American colleges. 

ATHLETICS ' 

At the special meeting of the Boards held in February the 
following report from a special committee was accepted and is 
here published as indicating the situation so far as the responsi- 
bility for the conduct of athletics is concerned : 

"An inquiry into the control of athletics at Bowdoin 
during the past thirty-five years shows that The Ath- 
letic Council of Bowdoin College as at present con- 
stituted has control over athletic sports insofar as that 
control can be delegated by the Faculty, students, and 
alumni. The governing Boards undoubtedly have para- 
mount authority over athletics, but they have not seen 
fit to exercise it except in a few instances. In the 
absence of action by the Boards, The Athletic Coun- 
cil has power to regulate athletics. 



Report of President 19 

"An investigation of methods and policies prevailing- 
at other New England colleges and a conference with 
The Athletic Council indicate that no radical change 
in the plan of conducting athletics at Bowdoin is needed 
at present. Certain modifications in administrative 
methods suggested by the Committee have been put 
into effect. The Athletic Council is endeavoring to 
centralize and strengthen its management of the differ- 
ent sports, and the Committee believes that the present 
arrangement should be continued until the result of 
these changes is known. 

"The tendency to commercialize athletic sports, par- 
ticularly football, apparently encouraged at some edu- 
cational institutions in recent years, has prompted some 
individuals to assert that the directing authorities of 
American colleges and universities must assume the 
drection of and responsibility for athletics. The Com- 
mittee believes that the objectionable practices under- 
lying this belief have not obtained at Bowdoin. Further 
developments • may make it seem advisable for your 
Boards to undertake a more direct and active control 
over athletic sports through a committee, a graduate 
manager, or some other agency ; but the Committee 
recommends that no action be taken at the present 
time." 

It is thus clear that for the present the control of athletics 
is vested in the Athletic Council subject of course to the 
authority which the Governing Boards undoubtedly have over 
all phases of college life. The Athletic Council as at present 
constituted is working in the closest harmony and co-operation 
with the officers of the College. Several important forward 
steps have been taken this past year, such as the institution of 
the freshman rule barring freshmen from 'varsity athletics the 
first semester, the centralization of financial responsibility in 
the graduate manager's office, closer supervision of budgets and 
estimates for the various teams, and other methods devised to 



20 Bowdoiu College 

secure better results in the conduct of the business of athletics. 
I desire to call the attention of the alumni to the fact that the 
Athletic Council itself is asking more and more of the College. 
At present we not only maintain the athletic building and the 
athletic field ; but we have built tennis courts ; we pay the full 
salary of the track coach ; and we are to appropriate quite a large 
sum for the conduct of freshman athletics. We believe that 
the physical development of the student is shown tangibly in 
our budget where the expenditures last year for the Physical 
Department amounted to $16,848.19. 

CONCLUSION 

The year has been a very busy one, particularly so far as the 
governing Boards of the College are concerned. The meetings 
last Commencement and in February were filled with interest 
and importance. Furthermore, a great deal has been done by 
the Finance Committee to put the business of the College on a 
firmer basis. When the College was founded there was no idea 
that anything except an educational institution was being set 
in motion. The early friends of the College had no conception 
of the thought that they were also instituting a large business 
corporation whose budget in a little over a hundred years would 
exceed $270,000 annually. While a college is by no means the 
same as a business organization, and it would be folly to apply 
the same business methods to it, it is yet true that it must con- 
duct its affairs soundly and in accordance with the best busi- 
ness practice. 

So far as the College itself is concerned, we have had rather 
an unusual number of difficult cases of discipline to deal with. 
Under the present conditions it is by no means easy to guide 
and control the younger generation which is used to so much 
freedom. We have not hesitated to deal severely with breaches 
of discipline. We feel that there must be at the helm of the 
College a firm but friendly hand, and that the Faculty is re- 
sponsible for the general conduct and morale of the students. 
At the same time we are endeavoring to secure the co-operation 



Report of President 21 

of the undergraduates in these as in all other matters, and no 
final decision in the case of discipline is reached until respon- 
sible undergraduates are consulted. The theory at Bowdoin is 
that responsibility for these matters rests with the Faculty, not 
with the students ; but that the students must be allowed and 
encouraged to give their advice and must be made to under- 
stand that their suggestions and recommendations are always 
welcome and given great consideration. In a word, to quote 
from a telling phrase of a president of a sister institution : 
'What the undergraduates have to say to us is always interest- 
ing, sometimes important, but not necessarily conclusive. " This 
may be a conservative attitude; but if so, it is that attitude of 
liberal conservatism for which this college for many years 
has stood. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kenneth C. M. Sills. 

May 24, 1924. 



REPORT OF THE DEAN 



To the President of Bozudoin College: 

Sir, one of your respected peers recently remarked that he 
could not — offhand, presumably — pass the entrance examina- 
tions of his own institution. There is no reason whatever to 
doubt his assertion. I do not believe that any college president, 
any college president, I repeat, sir, or even dean, could so pass 
them. In fact, if they could, it might be adequate grounds for 
suspecting them of official incapacity. With deferential res- 
ervations, I might hold the same belief and suspicion regard- 
ing any college professor over thirty-five, maybe under. But 
the public press made of that president's simple remark such a 
significant and heroic admission that for the first time I re- 
gretted not being a college president myself, with a reputation 
for heroism awaiting me just around the corner of veracity. 
As an obscure dean, I have made the same remark to my 
classes at least five times in the last five years without arousing 
any ripple of excitement. Perhaps my classes had no interest 
in the matter. Perhaps they did not believe me. Perhaps they 
had known it all along. Be that as it may, I never had the 
hardihood to trespass further on their indifference to my limi- 
tations. 

Yet here a college president makes the same remark and is 
acclaimed a hero. The press furthermore decides that Ameri- 
can colleges, after all, must have improved vastly during the last 
few decades. The very presidents could not get in nowadays — 
reporters apparently forgetting the "offhand" qualification — 
so naturally the colleges must maintain ever so much higher 
standards. One often hears alumni ruefully using the same 
evidence, applying it to themselves. Now we of the colleges 
have for so long a time been the target of every educational 
marksman that it is probably temerarious, as well as ungracious, 
to decline even a momentary modicum of praise. Yet, in all 
candor, we must confess that our demanding for entrance the 



Report of Dean 23 

presentation of new and more variegated sets of facts — most 
of which we rather promptly forget; that being, however, no 
capital indictment of them or of us — is insufficient evidence of 
better colleges. Obviously, neither Plato, nor Cicero, nor 
Isidore of Seville, nor Newton, nor Adam Smith could get into 
an American college in these days without further study — which 
is not proof positive that the boys who do get in are their 
intellectual superiors. Facts are, of course, very good things 
to have about one ; the world could ill spare them ; they even 
may play a small part in the reasoning processes which some 
educationalists appear to suppose can best be developed without 
them. But this mere acquisition of mere sets of facts, how- 
ever numerous of varied, is clearly not so indicative of men's 
quality as their ability and training in the use of those facts, in 
thinking, in arriving at solid conclusions. 

Now it has always been easy to lead students to the water of 
facts, thinking, and solid conclusions; it has been easy enough, 
even, to induce most of them to take a few wary sips; but how 
to prevail upon them all to plant their forefeet joyously on the 
bank and imbibe long and lustily, each according to his own 
capacity — hoc opus, hie labor, to use a new expression. Per- 
haps it can't be done — not, at least, for many aeons still. It 
certainly can't be done, really done, by any kind or quantity of 
pedagogical method or machinery. It is the spirit that quick- 
eneth — theirs and ours. But certain incentives and rewards, as 
well as certain pains and penalties, may do something to achieve 
better results from four years of exposure to college instruc- 
tion. Partly as reward, partly as incentive, we have this year 
granted three privileges to men of high academic standing — the 
class of students for whom increasing concern is felt in this 
day of quantity production of college graduates: we have al- 
lowed them to attend classes at their own discretion (incident- 
ally advising them to show some); we have allowed them, if 
Seniors, to take only as many courses as they needed to grad- 
uate, instead of the normally required four; we have allowed 
Seniors who passed their major examination with an honor 
grade to omit the final examination in their major courses. 



24 Bowdoin College 

I feel that these were sound concessions. Anything that 
makes for greater liberty wisely used is, to my mind, education- 
ally desirable, at least during the Senior year. I would be glad 
to see the day come when we could safely leave all our Seniors 
simply to their major courses, their major examinations ( made 
more severe), their love of learning, and their desire for scho- 
lastic honors. But that day is not yet. To throw all of them 
from our ancient dock of paternalism into the cold sea of even 
a supervised independence would be criminal carelessness, if 
not manslaughter. Meanwhile, as a partial immersion, I would 
be glad, as soon* as the Faculty is able to assume the extra bur- 
den, to see Seniors who had maintained honor grades through- 
out three years relieved, if they and their major department so 
wished, of other than their major course requirements, and en- 
couraged and directed in an attempt to do more independent 
work in their major field and to pass with distinction a more 
severe and searching major examination. Not many men would 
be eligible for this sort of treatment. Not all those who would 
be eligible would care to accept it. Those who did would be apt 
to enjoy it and profit by it. The class routine for the mature 
man of really exceptional ability who is grouped with many 
other men of a much lesser degree of ability, or disability, is a 
very uninteresting, uninspiring experience, and tends to produce 
an undesirable mediocrity of intellectual effort, of accomplish- 
ment, and, eventually, of brains. It is apt to be despite, rather 
than because of, such a system that American colleges attract 
and turn out as many both brilliant and industrious men as they 
do. But any progress — and there is so much progress to make — 
toward more attention to the individual student must perhaps 
wait until we have more money to put into instruction. 

For two or three years these reports may have been depress- 
ing to any alumnus who took my statistics seriously and my ac- 
companying explanations lightly. This year, however, my sta- 
tistics and my opinion concur in recording a very marked scho- 
lastic improvement. Largely because of our higher standards 
for admission and an impressively industrious freshman class, 
partly because of an increasing respect for faculty rigour, 



Report of Dean 25 

partly because of a somewhat greater interest in academic work, 
the figures in Tables V, VI, VII are agreeable. It will be 
noted, too, from Table I that though we opened the year with 
fewer men in college than the year before, we end the year 
with more men in college than the year before. Most of the 
gain — and this sort of gain is real gain — is due to the fact that 
we have not been obliged to drop nearly so many students for 
deficiency in scholarship. Moreover, the Student Council Cup 
(see Tables V, VI) was won with a better February average 
than for two years, and the Abraxas Cup (see Table VII) with 
a better general average than for four years. Table VIII show- 
ing that the very popular major departments, Economics and 
Government, do not fare so badly, after all, in the academic 
quality of the students they attract, should be rather inspiriting 
to the instructors and students in those departments. 

We have a still larger proportion than ever of students from 
outside the state, about 40% as against 12% in 1904-05. The 
Tables X, XI, XII showing the comparative standing of these 
men, and of Maine men, both in scholarship and in campus activi- 
ties are worth consideration; it will be observed that the Maine 
men are slightly in the lead. Similar statistics (see Table XIII), 
showing the standing of sons of our graduates and sons of peo- 
ple in general, may also prove interesting, if not universally en- 
heartening. With this cryptic comment the Dean will retreat to 
his crypt, behind a smoke-screen of figures. 

I. ENROLLMENT 

Number of 

Students enrolled Dec. 1, 1923 495 (Dec. 1, 1922, — 506) 

Students enrolled Apr. 1, 1924 473 (Apr. 1, 1923, — 453) 

Students withdrawn and removed since Dec. 1, 1924 30 

Students who have completed work for degree 7 

Students readmitted and entered 15 

Dec. 1, 1923 Apr. 1, 1024 

Students in Senior Class 82 76 

Students in Junior Class 97 94 



26 Bozvdoin College 

Students in Sophomore Class 147 

Students in Freshman Class 163 

Special Students 6 



495 



139 

158 

6 

473 



II. 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS 
FIRST SEMESTER 1923-1924 

Maine 293 

Massachusetts 130 

New Hampshire 16 

Connecticut 15 

New York 10 

Pennsylvania 7 

Illinois 5 

Rhode Island 3 

China 2 

District of Columbia 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Indiana 

Kansas 

Louisiana 

Michigan 

Missouri 

New Brunswick, Canada 

New Jersey 

Ohio 

Utah 

Vermont 

Washington 



495 



Percentage of students from Maine — 59.19. 
Percentage of students from outside Maine — 40.81. 
Percentage of students from outside Maine in 1904-1905- 



.T ^ 



Report of Dean 2j 

III. MAINE RESIDENTS AT BOWDOIN COLLEGE 

County No. 

Androscoggin 17 

Aroostook 15 

Cumberland in 

Franklin .1 9 

Hancock 8 

Kennebec 22 

Knox 10 

Lincoln 7 

Oxford 22 

Penobscot 17 

Piscataquis 6 

Sagadahoc 9 

Somerset 10 

Waldo . .' 1 

Washington 10 

York 19 



293 



IV. ENROLLMENT IN COURSES 

1923-1924 

Course First Semester Second Semester 

Art 1, 2 26 2$ 

Art 5, 6 17 14 

Astronomy 1,2 5 2 

Bacteriology 1, 2 2 2 

Botany 26 

Chemistry 1, 2 86 79 

Chemistry 3, 4 17 14 

Chemistry 5, 6 7 8 

Chemistry 7, 8 17 14 

Chemistry 9, 10 5 4 

Economics 1,2 92 94 

Economics 3, 4 18 16 

Economics 9, 10 47 42 



28 Bowdoin College 

Economics n, 12 61 64 

English 1, 2 145 137 

English 3, 4 45 134 

English s, 6 7 49 

English y, 8 6 6 

English 9, 12 42 70 

English 17, 18 55 50 

English 19, 20 25 2^ 

French 1, 2 11 20 

French 3, 4 118 no 

French 5, 6 55 54 

French 13, 14 21 20 

Geology 1 18 

German 1, 2 83 78 

German 3, 4 40 40 

German y } 8 23 20 

German 9, 10 5 8 

Government 1, 2 125 113 

Government 3, 4 41 41 

Government 7, 8 32 25 

Government 9, 10 46 40 

Greek A, B 34 30 

Greek 1, 2 6 10 

Greek 5, 6 3 3 

Greek 11,12 7 27 

History 3, 4 91 87 

History 9, 10 40 40 

History 13 8 

History 16 14 

Italian 1, 2 7 7 

Latin A, B 13 13 

Latin 1,2 37 36 

Latin 5, 6 9 10 

Latin 9, 10 2 3 

Literature I, 2 48 44 

Mathematics 1,2 1 13 113 

Mathematics 3, 4 18 19 



Report of Dean 

Mathematics 5, 6 7 

Mathematics 7, 8 3 

Music 1 33 

Music 3 17 

Music 5 3 

Pedagogy 

Philosophy 1, 2 78 

Philosophy 5, 4 11 

Physics 1, 2 58 

Physics 5, 6 6 

Physics 7, 8 5 

Psychology 1,2 67 

Psychology 3, 4 18 

Psychology 5, 6 6 

Spanish 1, 2 54 

Spanish 3, 4 3 

Surveying 1, 2 2 

Zoology 1,2 34 

Zoology 5, 6 15 

Zoology 7, 8 2 

Zoology 9, 10 37 



29 



7 
3 



20 

54 
26 

52 

7 

5 
70 

17 

5 
48 

3 

9 
29 

13 

2 

6 



V. STUDENT COUNCIL CUP STANDING—(Formerly 
Friars' Cup)— First Semester, 1923-1924 

1. Phi Delta Psi 11. 2419 

2. Chi Psi 9.9412 

3. Non-Fraternity 9.7000 

4. Sigma Nu 9-6556 

5. Delta Upsilon 9.1046 

6. Psi Upsilon 9.0909 

7. Beta Theta Pi 9.0909 

8. Theta Delta Chi 8.8250 

9. Zeta Psi •. ^>-743^ 

10. Alpha Delta Phi 8.2500 

n. Kappa Sigma 8.1539 

12. Delta Kappa Epsilon 77078 



30 



Bowdoin College 



VI. FRIARS' (Now Student Council) CUP 1911-1924 



Date 
Feb. 



June, 

Feb., 

June, 

Feb., 

June, 

Feb., 

June, 

Feb., 

June, 

Feb., 

June, 

Feb., 

June, 

Feb., 

June, 

Mar., 

June, 

Feb., 

June, 

Feb., 

June, 

Feb., 

June, 

Feb., 

June, 

Feb., 



1911 
1911 
1 91 2 
1912 
1913 

1913 
1914 

1914 
1915 

1915 
1916 
1916 
1917 
1917 
1918 
1918 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1920 
1921 
1921 
1922 
1922 
1923 
1923 
1924 



Average 

Delta Upsilon 

Delta Upsilon 

Delta Upsilon 

Delta Upsilon 

Delta Upsilon 

Delta Upsilon 

Delta Upsilon 

Delta Upsilon 

Bowdoin Club 

Bowdoin Club 

Beta Chi (now Sigma Nu) 

Alpha Delta Phi 

Phi Theta Upsilon (Now Chi Psi) 
Phi Theta Upsilon (Now Chi Psi) 
Phi Theta Upsilon (Now Chi Psi) 
Phi Theta Upsilon (Now Chi Psi) 

Chi Psi 

Not available 

Zeta Psi 

Theta Delta Chi 

Zeta Psi 

Phi Delta Psi 

Phi Delta Psi 

Phi Delta Psi 

Chi Psi 

Delta Upsilon 

Phi Delta Psi 



High 
Average 
1.9683 
5-3050 
2.1700 
5.75oo 
2.7750 
5.9700 
1.6150 
3.6700 

1. 3513 
4.1350 
2.1360 
4.9400 
2.6890 
5.9190 
3.1000 
7.0830 
1.7000 

0.1818 
2.6000 
3.6666 
3.6666 

0.3673 
1.2800 
9.2179 
2.1143 
1. 2419 



General 

Average 

10.0209 

12.2834 
10.0515 

13-1750 
10.4801 
13-6332 

9.7038 
12.4385 

9.9176 
12.8082 
10.3430 
12.9990 
10.6470 
12.4940 

11. 1353 
14.2610 
10.1637 

9-2534 
11.5920 

12.5949 
12.5949 

8.1516 
9.0321 

7.9641 

10.5400 

9.1254 



This cup has been awarded 26 times, 9 times to Delta Upsilon, 
4 times to Phi Theta Upsilon, which is now Chi Psi, 4 times to 
Phi Delta Psi, the local fraternity, twice to Zeta Psi, twice to 
the Bowdoin Club which no longer exists, twice to Chi Psi, and 
once each to Alpha Delta Phi, Theta Delta Chi, and Beta Chi 
which is now Sigma Nu. The non-fraternity group had the 
highest average for six semesters but since the cup is awarded 
to a fraternity or club, this fact does not appear above. 

The general average is the average of the whole college at 
the time of each award. 

The average of the general average, or the average of 
scholarship since 191 1 is 11.0540. 



Report of Dean 31 

The average of the winnenrs' averages is 12. 9466. 

These averages are obtained on the basis of A equalling 5 ; 
B, 3 ; C, 2 ; D, 1 ; and E, — 2. 

The best record, 17.0830, was made by Phi Theta Upsilon in 
June 1918. 

VII. THE ABRAXAS CUP 

The Abraxas Cup, awarded annually to the preparatory 
school, sending three or more men to Bowdoin, whose graduates 
attain the highest scholarship during the first semester of their 
freshman year, was won by Brunswick High School. 

Number Total Average 

School of Men Grades Grade 

Brunswick High School 5.5 67.5 \2.2727 

Deering High Sschool 3 36.5 12.1666 

Phillips Andover 3-i66 37.3 11.7894 

Edward Little High School .... 3 30.5 10.1666 

Portland High School 7.9 70.3 8.S662 



ABRAXAS CUP 1915-1924 






Date 
Feb., 1915 
Feb., 1916 
Feb., 1917 
Feb., 1918 
Feb., 1919 
Feb., 1920 
Feb., 1921 
Feb., 1922 
Feb., 1923 
Feb., 1924 



Winner 
Exeter Academy 
Portland H. S. . 
Dexter H. S. ... 
Skowhegan H. S. 
Edward Little H. 
Jordan H. S. ... 
Brunswick H. S. 
Portland H. S. . 
Deering H. S. . 



Brunswick H. S. 
General average — 9.1079. 
Winning average — 13.2016. 
The averages are obtained on 
B, 3 ; C, 2 ; D, 1 ; and E, — 2. 







Average of 


Winning 


all Schools 


Average 


Competing 




... 15.1250 


10.0740 




. . . 11.9000 


9. 1 180 




... I2.8333 


9.6207 




... 15.8333 


10.6560 


S. ... 


... 11.3333 


10.0694 




... H-3333 


8.6548 




... I5.i 2 50 


8.7295 




. . . 13.6600 


8.4650 




. . . 12.6000 


6.6676 




. . . \2.2727 


9.0245 


du the 


basis of, A 


equalling 4; 



32 



Bozudoin College 



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34 Bowdoin College 

IX. MINORS 

Department 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 

Art 1 2 4 

Biology 7 7 5 3 11 12 7 6 1 

Chemistry 12 15 4 9 15 21 31 20 15 

Economics 32 23 26 25 33 22 25 23 23 

English 27 20 9 18 36 28 27 20 23 

French 10 4 12 7 13 5 11 16 15 

German 32 37 43 30 42 13 13 18 20 

Greek 3 5 2 4 3 2 1 1 1 

History and 

Government 17 21 32 25 28 36 43 41 48 

Italian 2 1 1 

Latin 6 12 7 6 9 6 3 2 3 

Mathematics 3 13 6 5 9 10 15 4 3 

Music 1 1 4 4 4 2 4 

Philosophy and 

Psychology 2 8 10 5 4 7 4 7 11 

Physics 7 3 7 6 8 4 1 5 

Spanish 2 11 17 12 6 

158 168 164 144 217 181 204 176 183 

X. SCHOLARSHIP AVERAGE OF MAINE MEN AND 

NON-MAINE MEN 1913-1923 

% Maine Scholarship % Non-Maine Scholarship 

Class Men Average Men Average 

1913 76.9 80.3 23.1 79.1 

1914 75-o 7^7 25.0 80.3 

1915 73.2 81.2 26.S 79.6 

1916 ...... 73.5 81.5 26.5 82.9 

T 9i7 65.0 83.7 35.0 82.2 

1918 77.5 S2.6 22.5 7S.6 

1919 68.9 81.9 31. 1 80.6 

1920 76.1 80.7 23.9 79.4 • 

1921 73.1 82.7 26.9 82.7 

1922 78.9 80.3 21. 1 76.6 

1923 66.1 79.7 33.9 79.5 

General average for Maine men 81.2, for Non-Maine men 80.1 



Report of Dean 35 

XL CAMPUS ACTIVITIES OF MAINE AND 

NON-MAINE MEN 1913-1923 

% Maine Activity % Non-Maine Activity 
Class Men Average Men Average 

1913 76.9 7-38 23.1 6 -°3 

1914 75.0 8.29 25.0 6.47 

1915 73-2 7-79 26.8 6.32 

1916 73.5 7-06 26.5 5.79 

1917 65.0 7.90 35.0 6^3 

1918 77.5 6.05 22.5 9.15 

1919 68.9 8.59 31. 1 4.53 

1920 76.1 4.90 23.9 7.40 

1921 ... .... 73.1 5.82 26.9 8.94 

1922 78.9 7.01 21. 1 8.31 

1923 66.1 8.45 33.9 8.34 

General average for Maine men 7.20, for Non-Maine men 7.07 

In figuring the "Activity Average'' we used the following 
scale of points as a basis. Disputable as all such values are 
bound to be, this scale has at least the approval of the group of 
undergraduates who proposed it. 

Captains of the major sports 6 

Managers and varsity members of major sports 4 

Editors in Chief, Managers, of publications 3 

Honorary societies 2 

Class officers, Masque and Gown, Councils 2 

Musical Clubs 2 

Hockey, fencing, tennis, varsity debating 3 

Prize speaking, class and Bradbury debating \ l /i 

Members publication boards 1 1 /± 

All committees, class teams and squad members 1 

Clubs Vi 



36 



Bozvdoin College 



XII. LETTER? MEN AMONG MAINE AND NON-MAINE MEN 

1913-1923 



% Maine 
Men 

1913 76.9 

I9H 75-o 

1915 73-2 

1916 73-5 

1917 65.0 

1918 77-5 

1919 68.9 

1920 76.1 

1921 73-i 

1922 78.9 

1923 66.1 



No. Maine 
Men 

14 

15 

14 
22 

13 

13 

19 
12 

13 
17 



<# 







Non-Maine 
Men 
23.1 
25.0 
26.8 
26.5 

35-o 

22.5 

3" 

23-9 
26.9 

21. 1 

33-9 



No. 
Non-Maine 
Men 
2 

1 

4 

5 
11 

2 

2 

4 
8 

6 

12 



Class 

1920 
1 92 1 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 



XIII. ACTIVITY AND SCHOLARSHIP AVERAGE OF 

SONS OF ALUMNI 1920-1925 

Scholarship Activity % Other Men Scholarship Activity 
Average Average in Class Average Average 



% Sons 

3-7 
3-6 
9.6 

6.7 
4.4 

9-3 



77.0 

78.7 
77-7 
78.5 
82.5 

80.1 



2.25 

10.00 

6.44 

3-44 
7.50 
7-50 



96.3 
96.4 
90.4 

93-3 
95-6 
90.7 



80.2 


5.60 


82.7 


7.00 


79.2 


7.40 


79.6 


8.41 


77-3 


5.82 


7f>-3 


S.I3 



Respectfully submitted, 

Paul Nixon, Dean. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



To the President of Bozvdoin College: 

In accordance with the laws of the College I present herewith 
my 9th annual report on the condition and progress of the 
College Library for the year ending 31 March, 1924, the same 
being the 24th-25th year of my connection with the Library. 



SIZE AND GROWTH 

The number of volumes in the Library, including over 5,000 
volumes of medical works, is estimated to be 130,900. The 
accessions for the past twelve months were 2,232 volumes ; 
of which number 1,680 were purchased, — 1,287 at an average 
cost of $2.35, and 393 by subscription to periodicals that were 
bound; and, 552 came by gift, — 171 from the State and National 
governments by provision of law, and 381 from various per- 
sons and institutions. As heretofore, the Appendix to this 
report gives an itemized statement of the growth of the collec- 
tion during the year and its contents by the various classes in 
which it is arranged. 

ADDITIONS 

Again the amount expended for books has exceeded that of 
the previous year by a substantial sum. This statement could 
have been made at the close of each of the past five years, but 
only now can it truly be said that progress is being made as 
the earlier increases in expenditures were offset by increases in 
prices. During the past year the number of volumes purchased, 
was 50% greater than the number purchased the previous year. 
The momentum gained may be retained by the addition oi 
$1,000.00 to the annual appropriation, and this increase is re- 
spectfully requested. 



38 Bowdoin College 

Among the larger additions of the year may be mentioned : 
Das Kloster, in 12 volumes; Neudrucke deutscher Literatur- 
werke des 16. u. 17. Jahrhunderts, in # 245 numbers, bound in 
23 volumes; Storia letteraria dTtalia, in 12 volumes; Pascal's 
works, in 14 volumes ; Lepsius' Die grosse Politik der 
Europaischen Kabinette, in 13 volumes; Porter's Romanesque 
Sculpture of the Pilgrimage Roads, in 10 volumes; Jefferson 
Davis' Letters, Papers, and Speeches, in 10 volumes; and 
twenty-seven volumes of Spanish classics. 

Following our plan of securing, or continuing some important 
work each year, we have completed our set of the Auk by the 
purchase of 39 volumes ; and we have added to our set of the 
Berichte der deutschen Chemischen Gesellschaft, 99 volumes, 
covering the years 1889-1920. In each of these cases, -current 
subscriptions have been entered so that the sets may be kept up 
to date. 

Our sets of Administration, and of New Europe have also 
been completed. . 

Checks have been received from James E. Rhodes, 2nd., of 
the Class of 1897, Philip H. Kimball, of the Class of 191 1, and 
Charles A. Coffin, LL.D., (Hon.), 1922. 

CIRCULATION 

The number of books charged to borrowers for use outside 
the library building during the past year was 6,807. This is 
about nine hundred more than for the previous year. The 
largest number of loans for outside use in a single month was 
815, in December; the smallest, 89, in July. The use of the 
library for reference purposes has continued to be very satis- 
factory. 

CATALOGUE 

There have been inserted in the catalogue this year 5,246 
standard size cards. Of these, 4,002 were for new accessions; 
and 1,244 replaced old cards. Of the cards for new accessions 
2,736 were printed cards bought of the Library of Congress, 



Report of Librarian 39 

and 1,266 were typewritten. Of the 1,244 cards which replaced 
old cards 1,046 were printed cards bought of the Library of 
Congress, and 198 were typewritten. 

NEW CONSTRUCTION 

At the suggestion of members of the Examining Committee, 
who were impressed with the crowded condition of the stacks, 
blue-prints have been prepared and estimates secured from the 
Art Metal Construction Co., for the erection of steel stack% in 
the large room in the basement, immediately below the periodi- 
cal room. The installation of this new equipment would pro- 
vide shelving for about 11,000 volumes of periodicals and not 
only materially increase the efficiency of the periodical collec- 
tions of the Library, but also relieve the congested condition 
of the stacks and postpone for a few years the erection of cases 
on the fifth and sixth floors, — a piece of construction, however, 
that must be kept in mind and faced within a few years if the 
Library is to continue to grow in usefulness to the College. 
The plans of the Art Metal Construction Co., call for an ex- 
penditure of $3,200.00. Other expenses such as installing lights 
and heating pipes, and cutting through the floor for the stairs, 
will increase the total to about $4,000.00. The work should be 
done this summer. As no considerable repairs are necessary 
this year, the annual income of the Hubbard Fund, plus the 
accumulated income of the same fund, will nearly provide the 
needed amount, — assuming that all other expenses of the 
Library will be the same as during the past year and that the 
income from funds and appropriations will be the same. If the 
special library appropriation is increased by $1,000.00, as re- 
quested, a working margin will be provided, but it is hoped this 
may be for the purchase of books. If a second amount of 
$1,000.00 can be added a margin of safety will be provided and 
the progress of the Library assured. 



40 Bowdoin College 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

The following table presents a classified statement of the 

sources of the income and the nature of the expenditures of the 
library, arranged substantially along the lines recommended by 
the American Library Association. 

RECEIPTS 

1920-21 1921-22 1922-23 1923-24 

Appropriations, salaries . . $4,300 00 $4,675 00 $5,000 00 $5,000 00 

Books, etc 2,000 00 3,000 00 3,000 00 3,500 00 

Reading room 500 00 500 00 500 00 

Endowment funds, consol. 1,981 63 1,865 21 !,953 21 J, 956 59 

Appleton fund ........ 458 94 360 96 680 00 685 95 

Class of 1875 fund .... 49 98 67 50 101 25 80 00 

Drummond fund 135 00 105 00 211 80 211 80 

Hubbard fund 2,508 57 3,567 36 4,703 13 4,691 26 

Thomas Hubbard fund . 100 00 99 03 135 40 

Lynde fund 46 42 103 76 70 00 70 00 

W. A. Packard fund . . . 220 00 220 00 220 00 120 00 

Gifts, etc 200 00 260 00 163 33 75 00 

$12,400 54 $14,824 79 $16,701 75 $16,526 00 

EXPENDITURES 

Books $2,093 45 $2,314 76 $2,619 47 $3,358 14 

Periodicals 940 30 1,076 27 991 49 1,139 88 

Binding 915 59 599 66 499 33 85429 

Express and postage 131 83 80 41 98 89 121 51 

Increase of Library .. [3,071 17] [4,071 10] [4,209 18] [5,473 82] 

Library supplies 380 25 220 48 301 67 361 44 

Salaries, library service .. 6,190 71 6,618 21 6,890 50 7,432 15 

janitor service .. 1,042 00 910 75 945 98 872 70 

Furniture 354 40 115 00 1075 41420 

Repairs 26332 2,28485 1,56931 2,54179 

Supplies for building 55 44 95 10 3 2 35 24 01 

Telephone 3325 37 05 38 87 35 05 

$12,400 54 $14,352 54 $13,998 61 $i7,i55 16 



Report of Librarian 



4i 



ENDOWMENT FUNDS 

I add a table of the Endowment Funds of the library in order 
that the preceding table may be more intelligible and that the 
various funds and their donors may be recorded. 

Name of Fund Established by 1923 1924 



John Appleton 


Fred'k H. Appleton 


$10,135 


00 


$10,120 


00 


Class of 1875 


Class of 1875 


1,500 


00 


i,5i3 


22 


Samuel H, Ayer 


Athensean Society 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


Bond 


Elias Bond 


7,082 


00 


7,082 


00 


Bowdoin 


George S. Bowdoin 


1,020 


00 


1,020 


00 


Philip H. Brown 


John C. Brown 


2,000 


00 


2,000 


00 


Class of 1877 


Class of 1877 


1,013 


34 


1,013 


34 


Class of 1882 


Class of 1882 


2,300 


54 


2,300 


54 


Class of 1890 


Class of 1890 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


Class of 1 90 1 


Class of 1 90 1 


7i3 


34 


7i3 


34 


Cutler 


John L. Cutler 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


Fiske 


John Orr Fiske 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


General Fund 


Several persons 


1,364 


28 


1,364 


28 


Hakluyt 


Robert Waterston 


1,100 


00 


1,100 


00 


Alpheus S. Packard 


Sale of publications 


500 


00 


500 


00 


Patten 


John Patten 


500 


00 


500 


00 


Sherman 


Mrs. John C. Dodge 


1,176 


81 


1,176 


81 


Sibley 


Jonathan L. Sibley 


6,958 


37 


6,958 


37 


Walker 


Joseph Walker 


5,248 


00 


5,248 


00 


Wood 


Robert W. Wood 
Consolidated 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 




$35,976 


68 


$35,976 


68 


James Drummond 


Mrs. Drummond and 












daughter 


3,045 


00 


3,045 


00 


Hubbard 


Thomas H. Hubbard 


77,469 


53 


76,006 


3-2 


Thomas Hubbard 


His sisters and brother 


2,487 


96 


2,487 


96 


Frank J. Lynde 


George S. Lynde 


i,35i 


74 


i,37S 


00 


W. A. Packard 


William A. Packard 


5,000 


00 


5,000 


00 




$136,965 


9i 


$i35, 5-'7 


iS 



ADMINISTRATION 

There has been no change in the staff during the year. 
During the summer of 1923, extensive repairs were made on 



42 Bowdoin College 

the roof, under the supervision of Mr. Barrows, Superintendent 
of Grounds and Buildings. The unusual amount of ice that 
formed during the severe winter of 1922-23 tore open three of 
the main valleys, and it seemed best to replace them with 
wider valleys and extending copper flashings. In the light of 
experience and to take advantage of stagings already con- 
structed it also seemed best to replace several other valleys be- 
fore being forced to do so. It is believed that much trouble 
has been averted by doing this work before the next severe 
winter forced it upon us with a probable flooding of a part of 
the building. The total expense on the roof was less than 
$2,500.00, which is not more than should be expected annually 
for repairs on a building of this size. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gerald G. Wilder, Librarian. 

Hubbard Hall, 30 April, 1924. 



Report of Librarian 



43 



APPENDIX 

The Library, as Classified, showing Accessions for the Period 

From April 1, 1923, to March 31, 1924. 



Divisions 


bj ect 
imber 


-4-> 

i— 1 




TJ 

O 

T3 






s JE 


o 


• 1—* 


•d 


o 




m £ 


PQ 


O 


< 


H 



Bibliography oio 

Library economy 020 

General encyclopaedias 030 

General collected essays 040 

General periodicals 050 

General societies 060 

Newspapers 070 

Special libraries 080 

Book rarities 090 

Philosophy 100 

Metaphysics ' no 

Special metaphysical topics 120 

Mind and body 130 

Philosophical systems 140 

Psychology 150 

Logic 160 

Ethics 170 

Ancient philosophers 180 

Modern philosophers 190 

Religion 200 

Natural theology 210 

Bible 220 

Doctrinal theology 230 

Practical and devotional 240 

Homiletical, pastoral, parochial ...250 

Church, institutions, work 260 

Religious history 270 

Christian churches, sects 280 



16 


4 


20 


1,232 


5 


5 


10 


671 


1 




1 


876 




1 


1 


44 


96 


2 


98 


6,954 




1 


1 


200 


29 




29 


1,299 
368 




1 


1 


68 


10 




10 


312 


3 




3 


48 


1 




1 


51 


9 




9 


336 


1 




1 


32 


13 




13 


464 
90 


8 


1 


9 


852 


2 




2 


80 


4 




4 


623 


12 


1 


13 


1,826 

3i4 


5 




5 


1,847 


4 


3 


7 


978 








424 
872 


8 




8 


908 


6 




6 


879 


1 


2 


3 


I. I/O 



44 Bowdoin College 

Non-Christian religions 290 

Sociology 300 

Statistics 310 

Political science 320 

Political economy 330 

Law 340 

Administration 350 

Assosciations, institutions 360 

Education . , 370 

Commerce, communication 380 

Customs, costumes, folk lore 390 

Philology 400 

Comparative . 410 

English 420 

German 430 

French 440 

Italian 450 

Spanish 460 

Latin 470 

Greek 480 

Minor languages 490 

Natural science 500 

Mathematics 510 

Astronomy 520 

Physics 530 

Chemistry 540 

Geology 550 

Paleontology 560 

Biology 570 

Botany 580 

Zoology 590 

Useful arts 600 

Medicine 610 

Engineering 620 

Agriculture 630 

Domestic economy 640 

Communication, commerce 650 



2 


1 


3 


33i 


20 


1 


21 


994 


4 


10 


14 


769 


53 


29 


82 


3,728 


58 


4i 


99 


3,740 


36 


25 


61 


3,054 


17 


17 


34 


2,706 


5 


16 


21 


1,031 


35 


29 


64 


3,829 


12 


39 


5i 


i,725 


3 




3 


223 


26 




26 


479 
90 


6 


1 


7 


402 


6 


1 


7 


369 


2 




2 


22S 

45 


1 




1 


55 


3 




3 


33i 


2 




2 


274 


1 




1 


164 


24 


10 


34 


2,509 


9 


16 


25 


1,186 


10 


10 


20 


1,240 


17 


1 


18 


673 


105 


8 


113 


1,211 


4 


6 


10 


1,409 

70 


9 


6 


15 


712 


3 


4 


7 


706 


18 




18 


1,580 


6 


3 


9 


756 


17 


7 


24 


5,299 


2 


8 


10 


781 


10 


LS 


25 


1,104 
42 


27 


1 


28 


297 



Report of Librarian 45 



Chemical technology 660 1 

Manufactures 670 2 

Mechanic trades 680 

Building 690 

Fine arts 700 1 5 

Landscape gardening 710 

Architecture 720 1 

Sculpture 730 10 

Drawing, design, decoration 740 

Painting 750 2 

Engraving 760 

Photography 770 

Music . , 780 24 

Amusements 790 3 

Literature 800 23 

American 810 60 

English ; 820 1 19 

German 830 64 

French 840 48 

Italian- 850 20 

Spanish 860 32 

Latin 870 9 

Greek '. 880 23 

Minor languages 890 8 

History 900 29 

Geography and description 910 46 

Biography 920 63 

Ancient history 930 11 

Modern history, Europe 940 198 

Asia 950 9 

Africa 960 1 

North America 970 41 

South America 980 1 

Oceanic and polar regions 990 1 

Alumni collection 5 

Maine collection 21 

U. S. Documents 



2 


3 


200 




2 


123 
12 

25 


I 


16 


569 
125 




1 


27?, 




10 


161 

67 


I 


3 


359 
87 

74 


2 


26 


502 




3 


423 




23 


1,249 


30 


90 


5,142 


36 


155 


5,752 


3 


67 


2,758 


9 


57 


3,275 


2 


22 


1,017 




32 


302 


3 


12 


i,93i 


1 


24 


i,578 




8 


320 


3 


32 


1,258 


7 


53 


5,519 


17 


80 


2,419 




11 


686 


26 


224 


4,702 


1 


10 


215 




1 


104 


L3 


54 


2,825 




1 


^ 




1 


93 


2 


7 


1,356 


50 


7i 


4>36o 


20 


20 


w8^ 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE 
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS 



To the President of Bozvdoin College: 

The Director of the Museum of Fine Arts has the honor to 
submit the following report for the year ending April 30, 1924. 

ACQUISITIONS 

The following acquisitions have been received : 

A Spanish silver coin; half-cents of 1804, 1806, 1808, 1828; 
from Dr. Howard Clifton Jewett, of Haverhill, Mass.; May 
12, 1923. 

A watercolor landscape, by E. Roesler Franz, and a bronze 
bas-relief of Antinoiis, by B. Boschetti (from the Florence 
Mitchell Call collection); from Dr. Norman Call '69; received 
June 8, 1923. 

A silver tankard, made by Thomas Trott (1701 ?-iyy/?) of 
Boston; given by Hon. Henry Brewer Quinby '69, in memory 
of his son, Henry Cole Quinby, Bowdoin A.M., — a great-grand- 
son of Moses Quinby of the first class — 1806 — to be graduated 
from Bowdoin; received June 19, 1923. 

Three additional etchings for the Coffin Collection; Chemin 
des Roches, Rousseau ; Rue des Toiles, Bourges, Meryon ; Desert 
Freight, Algiers, by Kerr Eby; from Mr. C. A. Coffin, of New 
York, Aug. 4, 1923. 

A Fourth etching, Path through the Wood, Van's Grave- 
sande; given by an anonymous donor through Mr. Coffin; Nov., 

1923. 

Ninetv catalogues of the Coffin Collection, forty of which 

were specially bpund as gifts for members of the Faculty; these 

were carefully compiled by Mr. Coffin himself. 

A Venetian pitcher and base — the gift of Mary Young Mann 

in memory of her parents, Hon. Stephen Jewett Young '59 and 



Report of Director of Museum of Fine Arts 47 

Mrs. Young; received from Mr. Roland W. Mann '92, Sept. 

13, 1923- 
Two oil portraits, by Cloudman, of Mr. William Blake, the 

father, and Mr. Samuel H. Blake, the uncle of Mr. Edward S. 
Blake, of Bangor; two oil portraits, probably by Jeremiah 
Pearson Hardy, of the mother and sister (Mary) of Mr. E. S. 
Blake; a marble bust, executed in Rome by some sculptor un- 
known, of Mr. William Blake; bequeathed by Mr. E. S. Blake; 
received from Mr. F. W. Adams, executor of the Blake estate, 
Oct. 16, 1923. 

Sixty-six miscellaneous specimens of classical art, including 
coins (List No. 1 below) and six classical coins (List No. 2 
below) given respectively in Sept. and Dec, 1923, by Mr. 
Edward P. Warren, as additions to the Warren Collection of 
Classical art. 

List I 

Remarks on antiquities lent to Bowdoin College by E. P. Warren 

By Prof. J. D. Beazley 

1. G.P. 310.10. A marble statuette of a woman in rapid 
movement. Height .44 cm. She wears a Doric peplos, over- 
girt. The head (which was made in a separate piece) and the 
arms are missing. Probably a Graeco-Roman copy of a fourth 
century original. 

2. B.B. 267a. 3. A marble torso, probably of a satyr, al- 
though there is no tail. Perhaps a Hellenistic original. The 
glossy surface comes from the use of acid in cleaning the 
marble. 

3. G.P. 339.7. A marble fragment with floral decoration, 
part of a large Graeco-Roman vase of about the first century, 
B. C 

4. B.B. 270.1. A marble head of a boy. Augustan period. 
Over his left temple the hair has been (in antiquity) reworked, 
to conceal a damage. 

5. B.B. 253.6. A primitive terracotta female figure with 
decoration in black and red paint. Part of the quiff missing. 



48 Bowdoin College 

Height 15 cm. Probably Boeotian of about the seventh cen- 
tury B. C. 

6. B.B. 256.5. A terracotta cock in relief, cut round, with 
two holes for suspension or attachment. Height 085 cm. Traces 
of red paint. From Daphni in Attica. Greek work, not late. 

7. The upper part of an owl in terracotta. 
Height 035 cm. The head and body are covered with raised 
dots. Greek, about the fifth century B. C. 

8. B.B. 267.1. Terracotta. A comic figure, gesticulating 
wildly, seated on a braying mule. Height 09 cm. Traces of 
pink on the body of the figure; the greenish marks have been 
left by some bronze object which was near it. Compare Winter, 
Typen, 1.223,4, from Tanagra, in the British Museum. 

9. B.B. 267.3. A terracotta figure of a child kneeling on a 
rectangular base. Height 10 cm. From Samsun. On on* side 
of the base is a figure of a bird ( ?) in relief: the child is no 
doubt playing with the bird. On another side, the letter A. 
The figure is meant to be looked at so that the angle of the base 
to the right of the bird is nearest the spectator. The hands are 
broken. Hellenistic. 

10. B.B. 255.7. ^ terracotta figure of Eros, 068 cm. high, 
from Eretia. The body flesh-colour, the wings blue, the gar- 
ment pink, the support slate-grey. Hellenistic. 

11. B.B. 255.4. A terracotta figure of a boy wearing a 
coat. Height 075 cm. Greek, fourth or third century B. C. 

12. B.B. 266.7. A terracotta figure of a girl, iyy 2 cm. high, 
wearing chiton and himation, and carrying a fan. Red hair. 
Traces of blue on the chiton and of rose on the himation. 
Greek, fourth-third century B. C. 

13. B.B. 270.2. A terracotta jointed doll. Hellenistic pe- 
riod. Bought at Sotheby's, May 24, 1921. No. 211. 

14. B.B. 252.2. A vase in the form of a female head wear- 
ing a large stephane, which is decorated with maeander and cross 
in squares. The vase was an oinochoe, but the spout is lost. 
From the Hope collection, sale catalogue 49, 2. Height 123. 
Attic, about 500-480 B. C. 

15. B.B. 257.2. A red-figured askos. '062 high and '082 long. 



Report of Director of Museum of Fine Arts 49 

On one side, Eros flying to left with a flower in one hand and a 
tendril in the other; on the other side, Eros flying to right with 
his arms extended as if to meet and greet the other Eros. In- 
scriptions in white; on one side, HOPAIS, on the other, 
KALOS. Attic work of about 480 B.C., by the painter Makron; 
to be added to the list of his works given by Beazley, "Vases 
In America," pp 102-106. The only askos painted by him, and 
one of the finest vases of the shape. Bought from a Greek. 

16. B.B. 266.4. ^ white lecythos, '312 high. A woman and 
a man at a funerary stele. The woman carries a tray contain- 
ing sashes and garlands, the man holds a stick. The stele is 
bound with sashes. The outlines of the figures are in lustrous 
varnish, the patterns on the shoulder of the vase and above the 
picture in dull black, with red details in the palmettes; the 
sashes are red, the man's himation dull dark red. Bought at 
Sotheby's, sale catalogue Dec. 7th, 1920. Attic work of about 
450 B.C.; school of the Achilles painter. (Beazley, "Vases In 
America" pp 163-165.) 

17. B.B. 261.4. d l° w pyxis with red-figured decoration; 
height '05, diameter '131. Shape Furtwangler, Vasen in Anti- 
quarium, pi. 6, No. 231. The side is decorated with a laurel 
patten, the lid with figures of a lion, a bull, a boar and a panther. 
Attic work of the fourth century B. C. 

18. B.B. 259.6. A red-figured cup (cylix): diameter with- 
out the handles '25. Inside, within a border of maeander and 
chequer squares, two young bald satyrs at a fountain : the right- 
hand satyr is filling a hydria at the spout, which is in the form 
of a lion's head; the other has his left hand on an amphora. 
The exterior is lozengy, save for the palmettes at the handles. 
South Etruscan work of the fourth century B. C. Bought in 
Paris. 

19. B.B. 255.2 A perfume pot with the body in the form of 
an almond, and the neck and mouth like those of a pointed 
amphora; height '13. One handle. Mouth and neck are black. 
The rest of the vase reserved and decorated with impressed 
patterns, — palmettes, circles, and rifling. Greek, fourth century, 
B.C. 



50 Bowdoin College 

20. B.B. 248.7. A small rhyton with the lower part in the 
form of a ram's head; '12 high. On the upper part, a pattern 
of ivy leaves in white, with yellow touches. Bought at Sothe- 
by's, June 1918. Graeco-Italian, fourth century B. C. 

21. A fragment of a red-figured vase, perhaps 
a hydria, with parts of a seated and of a standing woman. 
Attic, third quarter of the fifth century B. C. 

22. A fragment of a red- figured cup; part of the design on 
the interior is preserved; within a reserved line the upper part 
of the figure of a young athlete, wearing a tight-fitting cap ; two 
letters of the inscription remain, apparently K O, possibly part 
of a love-inscription, for example (LU)KO(S KALOS). The 
style resembles that of the painter Onesimos ; about 480 B. C. 
From Italy. 

23. T.L. 6.6. R. 1870. A fragment of an Arretine mould, 
with a sleeping figure in relief, part of a banquet scene ; for 
the type compare Chse, Loeb collection of Arretine Pottery, 
PI. 4, and Catalogue of Arretine Pottery in Boston, PL 12. 
Signed by the master of the pottery, Tigranius (TIGRANI). 
Augustan period. 

24. B.B. 269.2. A silver tetradrachm of Mithradates VI of 
Pontus. Obverse, a head of the king. Reverse, within a wreath, 
a deer flanked by a crescent and star, the letters TKS and two 
monograms; above BASIAEfiS below, MIGPAAATOT ETIIAT0P02 
A — . From the Heseltine collection, Christie's, 19 April, 1921, 
No. 149. 

25. B.B. 269.3. A silver didrachm, Romano -C amp anian. 
Obverse, a head of Mars wearing a Corinthian helmet decorated 
with a figure of a griffin. Reverse, a horse's head bridled, and 
the inscription ROMA. From the Heseltine collection No. 151. 

26. B.B. 268.y. An Aureus of Augustus. Obverse, a head 
of Augustus, with the inscription AVGVSTVS DIVI.F. Re- 
verse, a bull butting, with the inscription IMP.X. From the 
Heseltine collection, No. 136. 

2 1 /. B.B. 269.1. An aureus of Hadrian. Obverse, a head of 
Hadrian; inscription HADRIANVS AVG COS III PP. Re- 
verse, Victory with chaplet and palm-branch; inscription VIC- 



Report of Director of Museum of Fine Arts 51 

TORIA. AVG. From the Heseltine collection, No. 137. 

28. G.P. 358.D. A diadem consisting of a strip of electrum 
decorated with stars and asterisks in relief, with applied studs; 
height '033, length '21. A somewhat similar piece is in the 
British Museum, from Camiros in Rhodes, is dated by F. H. 
Marshall in the eighth century B. C. (B.M. Catalogue of Jew- 
ellery, PL 13, No. 1 157). 

29. B.B. 268.6. A gold rope bracelet, decorated with pellets. 
From the Heseltine collection, No. 14. 

30. B.B. 256.1. A silver ring with an oval bezel. The bezel 
is engraved with a figure of a horse running, with a crescent 
above him. From Grotto Santo Stefano. Fourth or third 
century B. C. 

31. B.B. 256.2. A silver ring; the bezel, which is nearly 
circular is engraved with a figure of a Maltese dog holding a 
wreath in his mouth, with a crescent above him. From the same 
place as the last, and of the same date. 

32. B.B. 263.7. ^ 9°ld Ym 9 containing a sardonyx cameo 
with the head of a bearded satyr in white on dark brown. On 
each side of the hoop, near the bezel, a youthful bust in relief. 
Graeco-Roman, second century A. D. (?). 

33. B.B. 264.3. An octagonal conoid of amethystine chalce- 
dony, engraved with a figure of a leonine griffin with his off 
forepaw raised. Bought in Smyrna. Graeco-Persian work of 
the fifth century B. C. 

34a. B.B. 270.3. A gold ear-ring consisting of a rope-like 
wire terminating in a lion's head, with filagree spirals between 
head and ring. Greek of about the third century B. C. Bought 
at Sotheby's May 23, 1921, No. 251 (1). 

34 D - Another, terminating in the head of a 

leonine griffin with eyes of blue paste. From the same sale, No. 
251 (2). 

35. G.P. 326.6. A fragment of a glass vase with white 
figures in relief on a dark blue ground; the technique of the 
Portland Vase. A centaur struggling with a lapith. Graeco- 
Roman work. Bought in Rome. 

36. B.B. 257.6. A group of two figures in dark green 



52 Bowdoin College 

(clay?); a seated figure holding the arms of a figure standing 
in front of him. 

37. B.B. 261.5. Bronze figure of cat-headed goddess — 
Bubastis. Egyptian of 22nd Dynasty. Bought in Paris. 

38. A bronze weight consisting of a rectangular slab, .067 
by .071. The upper surface bears a bull's head, frontal, in relief, 
and the inscription AAMOSIA ArOPA N0ME0NT02 MENESENOT 
public property; Menexenos being clerk of the market). The 
letters are end-dotted. 

39. B.B. 290.2. Terracotta figure of Pan, with the infant 
Dionysus clasped in his arms. Bought in Greece. Greek work 
of the Hellenistic Period. 

40. B.B. 282.5. Terracotta figure of a standing goddess 
with flat body holding a fruit; one arm lost. Greek work of 
about 500 B. C. 

41. B.B. 282.3. Terracotta female figure of primitive type. 
Red details; Greek; of about the 7th century, B. C. 

42. B.B. 282.4. Ditto the last but smaller. 

43. B.B. 267.2. Terracotta head of a boy wearing a woolen 
fillet. Hellenistic work. 

44. B.B. 289.7. Clay relief cut out representing a sphinx 
with frontal head. Polos on the head. Old fashioned layer 
hair. Traces of red on body and wings, polos and lips. Part 
of legs missing. Greek work of mid 5th century, B. C. 

45. B.B. 290.6. Fragment of a clay relief cut out ; of Melian 
type; the upper half a winged woman, holding a hare and a dish 
of fruit. Greek work of about 470-460 B. C. 

46. B.B. 281.7. Lid r. f. crater and cover. On the body a 
boy's face and a horse's head. On the cover a female face. 
Both faces are in side view. The knob on the lid is inserted in 
the middle of the face. 

47. 290.7. A white lekythos in the middle of a grave stele 
terminating in acanthus. To the right, a youth with a chiton 
chlamys and boots mounting the steps of the stele. In his left 
hand a spear; his right hand raised with a gesture of adoration. 
To the left a woman moving toward the stele with a perfume 
vase and a wreath. Matt paint purplish, black details, ver- 



Report of Director of Museum of Fine Arts 53 

milion details. Attic work of the third quarter of the 5th cen- 
tury, B. C. 

48. B.B. 281.3. Youth reclining, right hand resting on right 
knee. 

49. B.B. 278.4. A bronze griffin's head, hollow cast from a 
cauldron. A complete cauldron, decorated with such heads is 
figured in Olympia 4, Page 115. Missing, parts of the ears and 
the pompon on the forehead. Greek work of about 600 B. C. 

50. B.B. 259.1. A bronze figure of a youth naked above the 
waist, with a garment from waist to ankles. He originally 
carried a burden on a pole from his shoulder. Greek work of 
the second half of the fifth century, B. C. 

51. B.B. 286.2. Cerberus squatting. 

52. G.P. 106.216. A small bronze bull inscribed 

Sacred to the Kabeiros. No doubt, one of a pair harnessed 
to a cart or plow, whence the plural in the inscription. Greek 
work of the 5th century, B. C. 

53. G.P. 355.1. Bronze vase decorated with bands of con- 
centric circles in relief. Underneath the foot plastic circles. 
Roman Period ( ?). 

54. A bronze support, part of a piece of furni- 
ture in the form of a herm of Silenus. Roman Period. 

55. B.B. 286.1. Faun; right foot forward; left arm missing. 

56. B.B. 288.1. A gold bracelet of bent double looped links 
and pear shaped sards, with lion's head clasp. Great work of 
about the 3rd century. 

57. B.B. 288.6. Silver hemidrachm of King Philip the 
Fifth of Macedon. (200-179 B. C.). Obverse, king's head; re- 
verse, club; monogram. 

58. B.B. 288.5. A golden Byzantine coin. 

59. B.B. 288.8. Silver stater of Elis. Obv., head of Hera ; 
Rev., thunderbolt and the letters. 

60. B.B. 288.11. Gold shekel of Persia. Obv., The king 
running with bow and spear. 

61. B.B. 288.9. Silver tetradrachm of King Perseus of 
Macedon (178-168 B. C.). Obv., The king's head; Rev., Eagle 



54 Bowdoin College 

on thunderbolt within an oak wreath. Monograms and plow 
as symbol. 

62. B.B. 287.3. Bronze forgery. 

63. B.B. 285.7. Marble statuette of Eros sleeping. Roman 
Period. 

64. B.B. 269.5. Bearded head in limestone. From a votive 
statue; probably a portrait of the donor. Archaic Cypriote 
work of the late 6th century or early 5th century B. C. 

65. B.B. 261.2. Marble fragment of head of a statuette of 
Heracles. Roman Period, 2nd Century, A. D. Based on the 
Hellenistic model. 

66. B.B. 281.6. Marble fragment of lower part of a statu- 
ette of Aphrodite. Beside her is Eros riding on a dolphin, 
his hand raised with a whip. Roman period. Second or third 
century, A. D. 

List II 

Six Coints Presented by Mr. Edward Perry Warren, 

December 1, 1923 

1. South Italian didrachm of Kroton. About 390 B. C. 

2. Euboean tetradrachm of Leontini. 

3. Aeginetan didrachm of Haliartus. Before 480 B. C. 

4. Aeginetan Triobol of Orchomenos. 

5. Aeginetan drachma of Tanagra. 

6. Aeginetan Obol of Thespiae. 

Mr. Warren not only added these fine specimens to the 
already rich collection which he had previously given the Col- 
lege, but came personally with his assistant, Mr. West, to un- 
pack, inspect, and arrange them in their cases in the Boyd 
Gallery, giving nearly a week to the task. 

Two books, Die Grieschischen Munzen der Sammlung War- 
ren, by Kurt Regling, Tafelband and Textband; received 
from Mr. Edward P. Warren, Mar. t, 1924. 

An oil portrait of Frank Edward Woodruff, late Professor of 
the Greek Language and Literature at Bowdoin, by W. W. 
Gilchrist, Jr., given by the Woodruff family; received Mar. 
1, 1924. 



Report of Director of Museum of Fine Arts 55 

A South American (Patagonian?) Bolas, given in 1921, by 
Louis B. Dennett '20; identified through the courtesy of Mr. 
G. H. Pepper, of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye 
Foundation, New York; placed on exhibition Mar. 21, 1924. 

LOANS 

The above mentioned portrait of Professor Woodruff was 
lent to the Museum from June 15 to Sept., 1923. 

WITHDRAWALS 

A mahogany table, lent by the Misses Martin, was sold to 
Mrs. Frank N. Whittier and withdrawn by her May 8, 1923. 

A pitcher, lent by Miss Ida Reed, was withdrawn by her 
September 27, 1923. 



The model of the Proposed War Memorial has remained on 
exhibition in Sculpture Hall, since September, 1923. 

During the past year soft-wood panels covered with Friar's 
cloth matching the plaster in color have been put up in the 
Assyrian Room and the large lecture room of the Walker Art 
Building, to serve as background for the Coffin etchings. In 
these rooms the Coffin collection is for the most part now ex- 
hibited, but six of the most interesting examples are displayed 
in the westernmost case of the Boyd Gallery. This arrange- 
ment seemed, on the whole, the most feasible and satisfactory 
one possible for the showing of the collection, since there is no 
one room in the Art Building available for use exclusively as 
a print room. 

To the collection of lantern slides about a hundred slides 
illustrating various works studied in the courses in art have 
been added during the last year, and the preparation of the 
illustrated catalogue of the slides has been carried forward, 
but not finished. From negatives in possession of the College 
279 small photographic prints for this catalogue were made by 
G. B. Webber, in March and April, 1924. 



56 Bowdoin College 

The general situation with regard to acquisitions to the art 
collections of the Museum should be clearly stated. It is surely 
the fact that the College will always be glad to receive and be 
very grateful for gifts of genuine artistic worth. It is a fact 
also that case space and wall space available for display in the 
Museum are now pretty well preempted. The policy which it 
is believed will meet this situation is that of exhibiting in rota- 
tion some lesser or greater portions of the various collections, 
combined with that of declining gifts which do not represent 
either a novel addition to our treasures in type or a finer ex- 
ample of a particular type than any examples we may already 
possess. 

Such being our situation and our policy, it is hoped that 
necessary declinations will not be taken as ungracious, or neces- 
sary temporary withdrawals as a slight upon the object with- 
drawn. 

ATTENDANCE 

The attendance during the calendar year was 81 11. 

Very respectfully submitted, 

Henry E. Andrews, Director.